Parole and Community

Director of Adult Parole Walt Pesterfield
Walt Pesterfield was named the Director of Parole for the Colorado Department of Corrections and assumed his role on Feb. 3, 2014.

Mr. Pesterfield is responsible for the division of adult parole, community corrections and youthful offender system.

He joins the Department after serving eight years as the Director of Community Justice for Oregon’s Columbia County Department of Community Justice, which oversaw both adult and juvenile divisions. Prior to this role he served a total of six years as an Adult Parole and Probation Officer in Yamhill and Benton counties in Oregon.

His long and established law enforcement career also includes work as a Juvenile Detention Worker, Treatment/Unit Manager, and Police Officer.

Deputy Director of Adult Parole Alison Morgan
Alison Morgan assumed the position of Deputy Director of Parole on Feb. 3, 2014.

Ms. Morgan transitions to this position with 15 years of correctional experience with the Department. Most recently she served as Assistant Director of Finance and Administration since 2009. Her career with the Department began in 1999 as the Legislative Liaison and has since held positions as a director of Public Affairs, Private Prison Operations, Prison Operations and Human Resources.

During her time with the Department, Ms. Morgan has been fundamental to strategic planning and analysis, engaging external stakeholders and building partnerships.

Welcome to the Division of Adult Parole, Community Corrections and Youthful Offender System

The mission of the Division of Adult Parole, Community Corrections and YOS is to provide public safety by managing offenders transitioning to the community through an array of supervision strategies, interventions, and re-entry services that instill pro-social behaviors that promote successful outcomes.

Click for the Colorado Department of Corrections mission statement.

Adult Parole

Supervision of persons who are approved by the Colorado State Board of Parole and includes Regular Adult Parole, Intensive Supervision Program-Parole (high-risk population), and Interstate Compact (probation and parole). Conditions of release from prison are made by an independent seven-member board appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Colorado Senate. Adult Parole supervises an average daily population of 8,501 parolees, while another 1,840 are being administratively supervised in other states by the Interstate Compact office.

Community Corrections

Community Corrections includes statewide community corrections centers and the Intensive Supervision Inmate Program. The Division has an allocation of 1,400 beds in community corrections centers and 900 on Intensive Supervision, or a target capacity of 11.5 percent of the Colorado Department of Corrections (CDOC) inmate population. Placement to the community is based on Community Corrections Board/Center approval.

Youthful Offender System

The Youthful Offender System (YOS) was established as a result of legislation enacted in the 1993 Special Session of the Colorado Legislature.  Senate Bill 93S-9 provided the State of Colorado with a “middle-tier” sentencing option between traditional adult and juvenile corrections.  This unique sentencing option is designed as a comprehensive model that delivers habilitation programs and services that prepare youthful / young adult offenders for successful community re-entry while ensuring for public safety.  Services for IDO, Phase I, and Phase II are located within a secure level III correctional facility in Pueblo, CO.  Services for Phase III (Community Supervision) are implemented throughout the state of Colorado with direct supervision being provided by Community Parole Officers and Approved Treatment Providers.

Community Re-Entry

Pre-Release assists inmates preparing for a successful transition from prison to the community through its 10 module cognitive based Pre-Release class, Community and Career Resource Centers and one-on-one coaching.  Community Re-Entry program services address those factors that contribute to recidivism: education, vocational and financial achievement, employability and housing, and contributes to the Department’s efforts to reduce recidivism. Community Re-Entry also works with case management, education staff, community parole officers, other state and local agencies and community/faith based collaborations to support the development and implementation of parolee community transition plans. Additionally, Community Re-Entry provides support services and case management that help parolees assimilate and remain stable while in the community, thus enhancing public safety.

Operations